Thursday, July 6, 2017

月うさぎ (Tsukiusagi in Kobe)

月うさぎ

DSCF7857.jpg

Warning, not a ramen shop!

DSCF7881.jpg

I was enjoying some Kobe hospitality from a couple of friends at their local izakaya, a kind of Japanese restaurant that serves small plates and lots of drinks. When the shop master overhead talks of ramen, he insisted we try his. Let's do this!

DSCF7852.jpg

High quality dried noodles.

DSCF7853.jpg

He whipped up a light chicken and dashi broth, reduced it with cabbage and aromatic vegetables, and served us a simple, hearty ramen.

Then he did this.

DSCF7862.jpg

Raw slices of Kobe beef. While the soup was hot, we did it shabu shabu style, swishing the raw meat to get it just slightly cooked.

DSCF7866.jpg

This also gave the soup a bit of beefiness.

DSCF7876.jpg

The desert, white miso ice cream, was a great way to end the meal.

Just a quick aside to show that not only ramen shops serve up ramen. Many places in Japan will use all the left over broth from their restaurant to make rice and noodle dishes, served at the end of the meal. This can certainly be considered ramen, though you'd never find a place like Tsukiusagi categorized as a ramen shop.

DSCF7888.jpg

Website here.



神戸市中央区北長狭通2-11-5グランドコーストビル8F
Hyogo-Prefecture, Kobe-shi, Chuo-ku, Kitanagasadori 2-11-5
Closest station: Sanomiya

Please consult for more information. They are generally open from 5:00pm.

1 comment:

  1. As you mention, the boundaries of the category are blurred. The Japanese statistical bureau records ~35K ramen shops nationally, whereas if you look for listings of ramen shops (some of which are no doubt expired) on tabelog the number is closer to 50K. Places like Tsukiusagi might also be counted in the latter. Tim R.

    ReplyDelete